Wednesday Weekly Blogging Challenge: Favourite Book Series and Why

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Hominids book cover by Robert J. Sawyer. Image on cover shows a picture of a neanderthal and a homo sapien.It was tough to narrow this down to only one answer, but I’m going to have to go with Robert J. Sawyer’s Neanderthal Parallax trilogy.

This series showed what happened when a link was established between our Earth and an Earth in a parallel universe where Homo sapiens went extinct and Neanderthals survived until present day.

Readers who have followed my site for a while may remember how much I enjoy reading fiction and non-fiction about the different human and human-like species that have lived on Earth.

What made this series even more interesting were the many cultural differences between us and Neanderthals.

If you picked out two humans on our Earth who had the least in common as far as language, culture, and life experience goes, they’d still be miles ahead when compared to introducing a Neanderthal to a Homo sapiens in this series.

To give a few of the least surprising examples, Neanderthals in this series have remained hunter-gatherers, have no farms or other formal agricultural systems, do not have a monetary economy, have no concept of religion or a belief in any supernatural being, and have a rate of serious crime that is all but non-existent.

Honestly, the world building is the most unique one I’ve ever seen. I can’t recommend it highly enough for that reason alone.

26 Responses to Wednesday Weekly Blogging Challenge: Favourite Book Series and Why

  1. I’ve never heard of this series, but it sounds like a twist on Planet of the Apes in that it will stretch the bounds of what we know our reality to be. Love this recommendation! I read a caveman romance a couple of years ago, and was pleasantly surprised that it completely absorbed me. It embodied a bit of time travel. This sounds like it would keep me engaged. Thanks for sharing!

  2. I go on non-fiction reading binges a lot, and from what I’ve read, there is a lot more of the Neanderthal DNA in our present day humans than we ever thought. There’s a “bump” on the back of the head, that’s a characteristic of them. Current thinking is that they didn’t disappear, as much as they were co-opted by mating with homo sapiens, which were more numerous.

    This series sounds intriguing. I may have to check it out, once I can get out to the library again! Only once have I been able to figure out how to download books onto my kindle from the library. And then I had a librarian right next to me, telling me what to click on next. I’m a bit of a Luddite!

    • Wow, I didn’t know about that bump coming from Neanderthal ancestors. That is so cool.

      Although I have read that that theory that Neanderthals were absorbed into a much bigger human population instead of going extinct, so it makes a great deal of sense.

      I hope you enjoy this series once your library reopens.

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